Dirham: coin from Kingdom of Morocco (1960-...); 100 franc

DIRHAM: COIN OF MOROCCO

1 dirham (درهم), 1960: Kingdom of Morocco

1 dirham (درهم), 1960: Kingdom of Morocco

Ruler: Mohammed V of Morocco (Sidi Mohammed ben Yusef) — Sultan of Morocco (1927-1953; 1955-1957) and King of Morocco (1957-1961).

Date on coin: AH 1380 (AH: Latin "Anno Hegirae" — "the year of the Hijra"; Islamic calendar) = 1960 (Gregorian calendar).

درهم - 1 - واحد: One - 1 - Dirham.

Coat of arms of Morocco: two lions, pentagram, sun over the Atlas Mountains, crown, Arabic "If you glorify God, He will glorify you" (Arabic "إن تنصروا الله ينصركم": quote from the Qur'an).

Paris mint, France: mintmark — cornucopia, owl — engraver general's privy mark (Raymond Joly).

المملكة المغربية - محمد الخامس: Kingdom of Morocco - Mohammed V.

Portrait of Mohammed V.

Mintage: 18.829.986.

  • Silver (0.600): 24 mm - 6 g
  • Reference price: 7$

COIN DIRHAM — WHERE & WHEN (coins catalog: by names & emitents)
  1. KINGDOM OF MOROCCO (17th century-...): dirham = 50 mazuna = 1/10 rial; dirham = 100 franc; dirham = 100 santim
  2. KINGDOM OF IRAQ (1937-1955): dirham = 50 fils = 1/20 dinar = 1/4 riyal
  3. HASHEMITE KINGDOM OF JORDAN (1968-1991): dirham = 100 fils = 10 qirsh / piastre = 1/10 dinar
  4. LIBYA (1975-…) — FEDERATION OF ARAB REPUBLIC, LIBYAN ARAB REPUBLIC + GREAT SOCIALIST PEOPLE'S LIBYAN ARAB JAMAHIRIYA + STATE OF LIBYA: dirham = 1/1000 dinar
  5. QATAR (1966-…) — QATAR AND DUBAI + STATE OF QATAR: dirham = 1/100 riyal
  6. UNITED ARAB EMIRATES (1973-...): dirham = 100 fils
  7. SOUTH YEMEN (1964-1984) — FEDERATION OF SOUTH ARABIA + PEOPLE'S DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF YEMEN: dirham = 50 fils = 1/20 dinar

The name of the coin dirham comes from the Greek coin drachma (adapted to the specifics of the Arabic language variant of the term). The drachma in ancient times was extremely common far beyond Europe.
By the way, in the numismatic literature you can find similar names of coins — "dirham" and "dirhem". Some sources consider them only different spellings of the name of the same coin. However, others (including me) distinguish these almost identical concepts: in the first case we are talking about a modern coin, in the second we are talking about a historical, ancient Arab coin.