Euro: coin from Republic of Lithuania; 2015-...

EURO: COIN OF LITHUANIA

1 euro, 2015: Republic of Lithuania

1 euro, 2015: Republic of Lithuania

1 EURO.

The face value of the coin is indicated on the background of the Map of Europe (Eurozone) — the reverse common to euro coins of all issuers. There are also 12 golden stars around the circle (the number of stars is not related to the number of member countries of the organization, but is a symbolic number that means absolute perfection; it is also the number of months in a year and the number of digits on a clock face, while the circle is also a symbol of unity).

Engravers: Luc Luycx (reverse, sign "LL") and Antanas ┼Żukauskas (obverse).

LIETUVA: LITHUANIA.

Coat of arms of Lithuania: mounted armoured knight holding a sword and shield, known as Vytis.

Lithuanian Mint (Vilnius, Lithuania): miniature logo in the form of the stylized abbreviation LMK (Lithuanian "Lietuvos Monetu Kalykla") to the left of the state name.

Mintage: 35.000.000.

  • Bimetallic — copper-nickel clad nickel centre in nickel brass ring: 23 mm - 7.56 g
  • Reference price: 1.3$

COIN EURO — WHERE & WHEN (coins catalog: by names & emitents)
  1. EUROZONE COUNTRIES + EUROPEAN MICROSTATES (Austria, Belgium, Croatia, Cyprus, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain + Andorra, Monaco, San Marino, Vatican; 1999-...): euro = 100 euro cent

EURO as coin name.
Euro — as of 2024, the official monetary unit of 20 states of the European Union (that is, not the entire EU — 27 states, but the Eurozone), namely: Austria, Belgium, Croatia, Cyprus, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain.
In most of the listed states, the new currency was formally introduced in 1999, but it has been in cash circulation since 2002.
Each Eurozone country issues euro and euro cent coins (1 euro = 100 euro cents) with a common reverse design (based on the image of the Eurozone map and, since 2007, the whole of Europe) and a unique national obverse.
In addition, some states that are not members of the Eurozone have the right to issue their own euro and euro cent coins: Andorra, Monaco, San Marino, Vatican; however, these coins are intended exclusively for tourists and numismatists and generally do not enter circulation.
Some European states (Montenegro and Kosovo), autonomous regions of Portugal (Azores and Madeira) and overseas departments of France unofficially use the euro as a valid means of payment in their territories, but do not produce coins.
To date, exchange and circulation coins of denominations of 1 and 2 euro, commemorative coins of 2 euro (issued since 2004, one coin per year by each of the countries; are in circulation, but often settle in collections), as well as jubilee/commemorative coins in 5, 10, 12, 20, 25, 50, 100, 200 euro (exclusively for numismatists; some countries also issue euro investment coins of exotic denominations).